Biophotochemical Applications

 


Agriculture

Medicine

 

Bio-photo-chemistry is the study of chemical reactions of molecules in electronically excited states produced by the absorption of infrared (700–1000nm), visible (400–700nm), ultraviolet (200–400nm), or vacuum ultraviolet (100–200nm) light on biological organism. Bond making and bond breaking as well as electron transfer and ionization are often observed in both organic and inorganic compounds as a consequence of such excitation.

 

Photochemistry, a sub-discipline of chemistry, is the study of chemical reactions that proceeds with the absorption of light by atoms or molecules Everyday examples include photosynthesis, the degradation of plastics and the formation of vitamin D with sunlight. Photochemical reactions involve electronic reorganization initiated by electromagnetic radiation. The reactions are several orders of magnitude faster than thermal reactions.

 

Photobiology is the scientific study of the interactions of light (technically, non-ionizing radiation) and living organisms. The field includes the study of photosynthesis, photomorphogenesis, visual processing, circadian rhythms, bioluminescence, and ultraviolet radiation effects.

 

Agriculture

Plants are the main productive organisms on earth. They provide world’s oxygen supply and are a primary source of food for other living creatures including an ever- expanding human population. The light energy stored in plants not only allows the plants to grow, but also supplies the energy needed for every other living organism on …

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Medicine

Photomedicine is an inter-disciplinary branch of medicine that involves the study and application of light with respect to health and disease. Photomedicine may be related to the practice of various fields of medicine including dermatology, surgery, interventional radiology, optical diagnostics, cardiology, oncology, rheumatology, sport medicine, neurology, and so on.   Light Therapy or phototherapy (classically referred to as heliotherapy) consists of exposure …

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